I Like My Haircut

(but not quite enough to call it a ‘hairstyle’)

Not long ago, haircuts were a functional, disciplinary thing. I had to have a short haircut for school, because it’s obviously inconceivable that a male person with hair beyond their collar could be capable of intelligent readings of King Lear. As a result, I have spent the first eighteen years of my life with a buzzcut out of sheer practicality, knowing that putting up with barbers’ small talk for fifteen minutes every few months was worth not getting a bollocking from teachers.

But now, there are no such rules in place. I’ve not (yet) grown my hair out, still preferring a shorter style, but I’m now aware that I have this style because I have judged it to look nice, rather than this style conforming to a set of rules imposed by another. My hair is subjectively preferable, not objectively acceptable.

Now, let’s not get ahead of ourselves. It’s still very much a schoolkid’s haircut, short on the sides and with enough of a floppy spike on top to be indicative of some semblance of individuality without deviating too far from the model of smart-dressed bullshittery we had to put up with as part of our uniforms. But the motivation behind said style is very different: today I decided to get my hair cut so it looked better. I decided that. Purely aesthetically.

And I went and did it! I spent money that could have gone to rent for next year, an aid project in Africa, or my obscene Doritos addiction, on a thing I didn’t need, but thought would be superficially pleasing. And, strangely enough, I don’t care. Not only do I not care, I actually like how my hair looks; this isn’t a source of termly obligation or narcissistic guilt, but of personal pleasure.

I feel faint.

Of course, I’ve been dressing myself for years, so this isn’t a complete watershed moment when it comes to me realising that if I have a physical body I might as well make a bit of an effort to make it not resemble troll dung. But this may be the watershed moment of my hair, the point at which I cared about my appearance in terms of the weird growths on my scalp as well as the sloganed bits of cloth I drape over my patchily-haired, podgy body.

Look out for a similar post this time next year when I discover the wonders of painting my nails, and I get really 2006-My-Chemical-Romance-fangirl on you.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “I Like My Haircut

    1. I was shocked to find my hairdresser has raised their prices from £6 to £9 for me. Although I’ve been told women’s haircuts tend to cost as much as a small Caribbean island so I can’t complain too much.

      1. Oh yeah. I would be thrilled if I could get a decent haircut for that price. In Colombia, I paid that price (but that amount of money is “worth” a lot more than that). In the USA, I pay at least twice that, and I am still going somewhere that is reasonably priced.

          1. So, if I go in and get a buzz cut are they going to charge me more than they would charge you for the same haircut? Or if you go in and get a women’s haircut (which usually takes a lot more time to do), would they charge you more? I’ve always wondered this. I don’t mind paying more than most men do because my haircut takes an hour to an hour and a half while most men I know get their haircut in under thirty minutes.

            1. All men’s haircuts would last at least an hour, and all women’s would take no more than thirty minutes. That way we can reverse the usual charges for haircuts while keeping something resembling a fair, practical reason for all this.

              Also I consider anything longer than fifteen minutes to be too long for a haircut.

  1. Okay, this comment apparently proves that I’m human, but I’ve been referred to as a potato far too many times to convince me otherwise.
    I’d talk about haircuts too, but I have a history of going off tangent while talking or writing, so I’m trying not to digress.
    So: I nominated you for the Encouraging Thunder award and for a 3-Day Quote challenge, and you can get more information about both on my blog (you aren’t obliged to accept either).
    And…… that’s all.

Leave a comment if you want to prove you're human

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s